Secret of Epilepsy Discovered in Jerusalem

Secret of Epilepsy Discovered in Jerusalem

Secret of Epilepsy Discovered in Jerusalem Unable to figure out what causes the neurological disorder, the scientists thought to ask: What causes normal people (or lab animals) not to have it? Discovered : Epileptic seizures are caused by abnormal activity in our brain. We know that. Attacks can be unprovoked or can be the result from a tendency that is created, for instance, by head trauma or exposure to certain triggers. We know that too. We don’t know, however, is why some people are prone to epilepsy and some are…

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Inmarsats European short-haul wi-fi spacecraft launches

Inmarsats

Inmarsats European short-haul wi-fi spacecraft launches Inmarsats : A new Europe-wide wi-fi service for aeroplanes came a step closer on Wednesday night with the launch of a key satellite from French Guiana. Airline passengers will soon be able to connect to the internet either through this spacecraft or a complementary system of cell towers on the ground. The company behind the so-called European Aviation Network is Inmarsat, the UK’s biggest satellite operator. It is building the system in tandem with Deutsche Telekom of Germany. The pair hope to start services at the…

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China sets new record for quantum entanglement en route to build new communication network

China sets new record for quantum entanglement en route to build new communication network

China sets new record for quantum entanglement en route to build new communication network CHINA has scored a victory against hackers and spooks as it surges ahead of other world powers in a new kind of space race. China has used a laser on a satellite orbiting 480 kilometres above the earth to produce entangled photons and beam them to stations on the ground. Picture: Cai Yang/Xinhua via ZUMA IN A bid to build an entirely new kind of internet — completely secure and impervious to hackers — China has…

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Snapchat acquires drone manufacturing company for less than $1 million: Report

Snapchat acquires drone manufacturing company for less than $1 million: ReportSnapchat, Ctrl Me Robotics, Snapchat acquires drone company, Snapchat Ctrl Me Robotics deal, Snapchat acquisitionSnapchat has acquired Venice Beach-based drone manufacturer called Ctrl Me Robotics for less than a million dollars. Ctrl Me Robotics put out an Instagram post with caption, "Snapchat from your Drone." Picture reveals a drone fitted with a smartphone.

Snapchat acquires drone manufacturing company for less than $1 million: ReportSnapchat has acquired Venice Beach-based drone manufacturer called Ctrl Me Robotics for less than a million dollars. Ctrl Me Robotics put out an Instagram post with caption, “Snapchat from your Drone.” Picture reveals a drone fitted with a smartphone. SnBuzzFeed. “Ctrl Me was in the process of winding down when it approached Snap about a possible deal, a source with knowledge of the situation told BuzzFeed News,” the report reads. Ctrl Me Robotics put out an Instagram post with caption, “Snapchat* from your Drone.”…

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NASA to launch world’s first mission to Sun in 2018

NASA to launch world’s first mission to Sun in 2018

NASA to launch world’s first mission to Sun in 2018 The spacecraft and instruments will be protected from the Sun’s heat by a 4.5-inch-thick carbon-composite shield and will solve many of the largest mysteries about our star, including finding out why the Sun’s corona is so much hotter than its surface. NASA is set to launch the world’s first mission to the Sun next year, that will explore our star’s atmosphere and answer questions about solar physics that have puzzled scientists for over six decades. The Parker Solar Probe has been…

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Chipmakers at Computex 2017 look beyond crowded smartphone market

Chipmakers at Computex 2017 look beyond crowded smartphone market

Chipmakers at Computex 2017 look beyond crowded smartphone market Chipmakers switched focus at Taiwan’s Computex event with bets on new areas such as driverless cars, virtual reality and artificial intelligence, shifting away from smartphones where intense competition has pushed down components prices. Chipmakers switched focus at Taiwan’s top tech fair this week with bets on new areas such as driverless cars, virtual reality and artificial intelligence, shifting away from smartphones where intense competition has pushed down components prices. The Computex Taipei event, now in its 36th year, has historically been a…

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T-Rex bone protein proves Jurassic Park will never exist, claims study

Tyrannosaurus

T-Rex bone protein proves Jurassic Park will never exist, claims study The discovery of proteins in dinosaur bones sent a shock-wave around the world, both among scientists and the public. (Source: University of Manchester) Jurassic Park will never become a reality, say scientists after re-analysing a protein from a Tyrannosaurus rex bone discovered more than a decade ago. Jurassic World is a concept of science-fiction where a theme park is populated with cloned dinosaurs. Jurassic Park will never become a reality, say scientists after re-analysing a protein from a Tyrannosaurus rex…

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ISRO’s launch: Tech denied, how this was Made in India

ISRO’s launch: Tech denied, how this was Made in India

ISRO’s launch: Tech denied, how this was Made in India The GSLV Mk III, in the course of its first development flight, delivered the GSAT-19 satellite — the heaviest launched from Indian soil — to a geosynchronous transfer orbit following the launch at 5:28 pm. (Source: Twitter/ @isro) Behind the success of the launch is nearly three decades of hard work in taming cryogenic technology and an interesting history of this technology was denied to ISRO by the United States in the early 1990s, forcing it develop it on its own.…

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Cosmic rays may double cancer risks for astronauts travelling to Mars

Cosmic rays may double cancer risks for astronauts travelling to Mars

Cosmic rays may double cancer risks for astronauts travelling to Mars Conventional risk models used by NASA and others assume DNA damage and mutation are the cause of radiation cancers. (Image for representation, Source: Pixabay) Astronauts travelling to Mars or other deep space missions may be at a two-fold higher risk of developing cancer than previously assumed, due to exposure to cosmic rays outside the protection of Earth’s magnetic field, a new study warns. Astronauts travelling to Mars or other deep space missions may be at a two-fold higher risk of…

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Romanian scientists rebel against a power grab by their government

Romanian scientists rebel against a power grab by their government

Romanian scientists rebel against a power grab by their government Romanian scientists are engaged in a battle with their government about an alleged power grab that they say will lead to the diversion of research money to government cronies and will isolate Romania’s small scientific community just as it was beginning to nurture connections to the rest of the world. Research minister Șerban Valeca, an engineer appointed by the new social-democratic government in January, has dismissed almost the entire membership of four councils that provide advice on funding policy, research…

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Planet is ‘hotter than most stars’

Planet is 'hotter than most stars'

Planet is ‘hotter than most stars’   Scientists have found a hellish world where the “surface” of the planet is over 4,000C – almost as hot as our Sun. In part, that’s because KELT-9b’s host star is itself very hot, but also because this alien world resides so close to the furnace. KELT-9b takes just two days to complete one orbit of the star. Being so close means the planet cannot exist for very long – the gases in its atmosphere are being blasted with radiation and lost to space.…

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This Dystopian Device Warns You When AI Is Trying to Impersonate Actual Humans

This Dystopian Device Warns You When AI Is Trying to Impersonate Actual Humans

This Dystopian Device Warns You When AI Is Trying to Impersonate Actual Humans   Scared of a future where you can no longer discern if you’re dealing with a hutman or a compuer? A team of Australian researchers have come up with what they call the Anti-AI AI. The wearable prototype device is designed to identify synthetic speech and alert the user that the voice they’re listening doesn’t belong to a flesh-and-blood individual. Developed as a proof of concept in just five days, the prototype makes use of a neural network powered…

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Top stories: Naked mole rat superpowers, a deadly salamander disease, and alternatives to grant writing

Top stories: Naked mole rat superpowers, a deadly salamander disease, and alternatives to grant writing

Top stories: Naked mole rat superpowers, a deadly salamander disease, and alternatives to grant writing Science is covering the March for Science worldwide. Be sure to check out our live coverage on the day of here, and also see all of our stories on the march. With this new system, scientists never have to write a grant application again Almost every scientist agrees: Applying for research funding is a drag. Writing a good proposal can take months, and the chances of getting funded are often slim. Funding agencies, meanwhile, spend…

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Top stories: Disappearing insects, Descartes’s bulging brain, and a priceless botanical breakdown

Top stories: Disappearing insects, Descartes’s bulging brain, and a priceless botanical breakdown

Top stories: Disappearing insects, Descartes’s bulging brain, and a priceless botanical breakdown Where have all the insects gone? Entomologists call it the windshield phenomenon: Car windshields used to be covered in the spring and summer months with the remains of insects. That’s not the case in many places today. Observations about splattered bugs don’t count as scientific, so now researchers are turning to more than 30 years of data collected by a dedicated group of mostly amateur entomologists across western Europe. And what they’ve found supports the anecdotes: dramatic drops—up to…

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Sperm frozen in space produce healthy mouse pups

Sperm frozen in space produce healthy mouse pups

Sperm frozen in space produce healthy mouse pups If NASA wants to send humans to Mars, it will probably also send along an unusual provision for the interplanetary journey: sperm. A diverse supply of human sperm could ensure the genetic diversity of a new colony, which is critical to a healthy population. But no one knows whether the reproductive cells could withstand the ravages of DNA-damaging radiation in space. Now, a new study shows that mouse sperm stored for more than 9 months on the International Space Station (ISS)—where radiation…

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Top stories: Immigrant bloodlines analyzed, illegal petunias destroyed, and superstar surgeon fired again

Top stories: Immigrant bloodlines analyzed, illegal petunias destroyed, and superstar surgeon fired again

Top stories: Immigrant bloodlines analyzed, illegal petunias destroyed, and superstar surgeon fired again There’s no such thing as a ‘pure’ European—or anyone else Immigrant : New studies show that there is no such thing as “pure” European—or anyone else. Almost all of us are the children of repeated ancient migrations, according to researchers who study human origins. Using revolutionary new methods to analyze DNA and the isotopes found in bones and teeth, scientists are exposing the tangled roots of peoples around the world. Few of us are actually the direct…

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Maverick scientist thinks he has discovered a magnetic sixth sense in humans

Maverick scientist thinks he has discovered a magnetic sixth sense in humansJoe Kirschvink, sporting an EEG sensor cap, was the first subject in his magnetic-sensing tests.

Maverick scientist thinks he has discovered a magnetic sixth sense in humans Maverick  : Birds do it. Bees do it. But the human subject, standing here in a hoodie—can he do it? Joe Kirschvink is determined to find out. For decades, he has shown how critters across the animal kingdom navigate using magnetoreception, or a sense of Earth’s magnetic field. Now, the geophysicist at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in Pasadena is testing humans to see if they too have this subconscious sixth sense. Kirschvink is pretty sure they…

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Beyond Taste Buds: The Science of Delicious

Beyond Taste Buds: The Science of Delicious

Beyond Taste Buds: The Science of Delicious Taste receptors, volatiles, gustatory cortex: There’s more to yum than you might think. Taste Is Chemistry It begins when a food molecule touches a microscopic taste bud on the tongue. The buds hide inside papillae, the pale dots made visible here by blue food coloring. In the brain, where taste merges with other senses, it becomes the rich, personal, joyful experience that makes us long to eat. JULIE MENNELLA, A BIOLOGIST who studies the sense of taste in babies and toddlers, often records…

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New species of Tyrannosaur with a crocodile snout was a ‘sensitive lover’ and had a SIXTH SENSE to hunt its prey

New species of Tyrannosaur with a crocodile snout was a 'sensitive lover' and had a SIXTH SENSE to hunt its prey Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-4361396/Scientists-dinosaur-morphed-different-species.html#ixzz4j13e0PlA Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

New species of Tyrannosaur with a crocodile snout was a ‘sensitive lover’ and had a SIXTH SENSE to hunt its prey A new dinosaur dug out of the badlands of Montana has changed the face of Tyrannosaur Rex. The Daspletosaurus horneri, or ‘Horner’s Frightful Lizard’, was almost as big as the largest carnivore ever to stalk the Earth with tiny horns and a crocodile-like snout. The dinosaur, which lived 74 million years, had a nerve which had an evolutionary history of developing into wildly different ‘sixth senses’. The nerve, located…

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Scientists Have Just Discovered a New State of Matter

Scientists Have Just Discovered a New State of Matter

Scientists Have Just Discovered a New State of Matter Scientists : Researchers have just discovered evidence of a mysterious new state of matter in a real material. The state is known as ‘quantum spin liquid’ and it causes electrons – one of the fundamental, indivisible building blocks of matter – to break down into smaller quasiparticles. Scientists had first predicted the existence of this state of matter in certain magnetic materials 40 years ago, but despite multiple hints of its existence, they’ve never been able to detect evidence of it…

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Scientists discover a sixth sense on the tongue—for water

Scientists discover a sixth sense on

Scientists discover a sixth sense on the tongue—for water Scientists : Viewed under a microscope, your tongue is an alien landscape, studded by fringed and bumpy buds that sense five basic tastes: salty, sour, sweet, bitter, and umami. But mammalian taste buds may have an additional sixth sense—for water, a new study suggests. The finding could help explain how animals can tell water from other fluids, and it adds new fodder to a centuries-old debate: Does water have a taste of its own, or is it a mere vehicle for…

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Citizen scientists join the search for Planet 9

Citizen scientists join the search for Planet 9

Citizen scientists join the search for Planet 9   Astronomers want you in on the search for the solar system’s ninth planet. In the online citizen science project Backyard Worlds: Planet 9, space lovers can flip through space images and search for this potential planet as well as other far-off worlds awaiting discovery. The images, taken by NASA’s Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer satellite, offer a peak at a vast region of uncharted territory at the far fringes of the solar system and beyond. One area of interest is a ring…

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LIGO snags another set of gravitational waves

LIGO snags another set of gravitational waves

LIGO snags another set of gravitational waves Spacetime vibrations arrive from black hole collision 3 billion light-years away For a third time, scientists have detected the infinitesimal reverberations of spacetime: gravitational waves. Two black holes stirred up the spacetime wiggles, orbiting one another and spiraling inward until they fused into one jumbo black hole with a mass about 49 times that of the sun. Ripples from that union, which took place about 3 billion light-years from Earth, zoomed across the cosmos at the speed of light, eventually reaching the Advanced…

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Do You Have Rh Negative Blood? New Theory Suggests Your DNA Doesn’t Come From Earth

Negative

Do You Have Rh Negative Blood? New Theory Suggests Your DNA Doesn’t Come From Earth An interesting new theory suggests if you have an RH negative blood type, you may have a kind of “alien DNA”. Studies show that Rh negative blood types do not carry the gene originating from the rhesus monkey, the supposed animal humans evolved from. So if we have all come from monkeys, why do some people not carry that crucial gene?  There are 4 blood types that we know of: A, B, AB and O.…

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Self-driving hearse could project holograms of the dead

Self-driving hearse could project holograms of the dead

Self-driving hearse could project holograms of the dead A concept robotic hearse tricked out with a transparent coffin and multimedia system could drive funerals of the future. We may or may not see driverless cars on the road in this life, but if the crazy concept Aeternalbecomes a real thing, we could be riding in them after our death. The futuristic, high-tech hearse from Imaginactive, a Montreal-based nonprofit purveyor of creative ideas, would be auto-piloted or driven by remote control and could maneuver in tight spots at funeral homes and…

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Scientists Have Stored a Movie, a Computer OS, and an Amazon Gift Card in a Single Speck of DNA


Scientists

Scientists Have Stored a Movie, a Computer OS, and an Amazon Gift Card in a Single Speck of DNA
 Scientists have developed what they claim is the most efficient data storage technique ever, with a new DNA-encoding method that approaches the theoretical maximum for information stored per nucleotide. Using an algorithm called DNA Fountain, the researchers squeezed six files into a single speck of DNA – including a short film, an entire computer OS, and an Amazon gift card – but that’s just for starters. The team says the same…

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Talking Sex Robots With Warm Genitals Will Be on Sale This Year

Talking Sex Robots With Warm Genitals Will Be on Sale This Year

Talking Sex Robots With Warm Genitals Will Be on Sale This Year They’ll cost about $15,000 and, presumably, a little bit of your dignity. A trip to Westworld costs $40,000 a day, but by next year, you’ll be able to simulate at least part of the experience for less than half that price, because a new line of upsettingly realistic sex robots is going to hit the market. They might not have cowboy hats by default, but they do have warm genitals. Writing in The Daily Mail, robotics expert David…

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Stanford Scientists Observe Man Travel ‘Outside His Body’ & Into Space – What He Saw Was Remarkable

Stanford

Stanford Scientists Observe Man Travel ‘Outside His Body’ & Into Space – What He Saw Was Remarkable It was more than four decades ago when NASA’s Pioneer 10 spacecraft was launched into space. For the first time ever, our world was able to witness the very first spacecraft to fly directly through the asteroid belt and make observations of Jupiter, the biggest planet in our solar system. Before this happened, the CIA and NSA, in conjunction with Stanford University, were involved in what was called “Remote Viewing.” Remote viewing can be…

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Scientists turn SPINACH LEAVES into working human heart tissue

Scientists turn SPINACH LEAVES into working human heart tissue

Scientists turn SPINACH LEAVES into working human heart tissue Researchers have turned a spinach leaf into working heart tissue. Scientists : The breakthrough could be revolutionary as scientists appear to have found a way to solve the problem of recreating the tiny, networks of blood vessels that branch throughout human tissue. Up until this point, scientists had tried to use 3D-printing to recreate such delicate and intricate networks, but the technique was unsuccessful.     In this sequence, a spinach leaf is stripped of its plant cells, a process called decellularization,…

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Ghostly Images of WiFi Signals Captured Using Long Exposure Photography and an Android App

Ghostly Images of WiFi Signals Captured Using Long Exposure Photography and an Android App

Ghostly Images of WiFi Signals Captured Using Long Exposure Photography and an Android App So much of the world today is invisible to cameras. Technology operates in a light-less world of zeroes and ones, electromagnetic waves that fly over our heads in ever-increasing abundance. For his fascinating project Digital Ethereal, designer Luis Hernan set out to capture one of these invisible signals, WiFi, using a creative combination of long exposure photography and an Android app. Since you can’t just set up your camera next to your router, click the shutter…

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Astronomers Are About to See a Black Hole’s Event Horizon for the First Time

Astronomers Are About to See a Black Hole’s Event Horizon for the First Time

Astronomers Are About to See a Black Hole’s Event Horizon for the First Time Ever since first mentioned by Jon Michell in a letter to the Royal Society in 1783, black holes have captured the imagination of scientists, writers, filmmakers and other artists. Perhaps part of the allure is that these enigmatic objects have never actually been ‘seen’. But this could now be about to change as an international team of astronomers is connecting a number of telescopes on Earth in the hope of making the first ever image of…

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10 Ways to Supercharge Your Dopamine Levels to Never Feel Sad, Stressed or Depressed Again

Supercharge

10 Ways to Supercharge Your Dopamine Levels to Never Feel Sad, Stressed or Depressed Again Supercharge : Our brain releases a neurotransmitter, dopamine, which is crucial for numerous essential bodily functions. Dopamine is great for the following body functions: Regulating movement Controlling the center of pleasure and reward in the brain Improving the cognitive functions (knowledge, attention, memory, decision-making, evaluation, problem solving) Regulating the secretion of prolactin Since it is extremely important for our wellbeing and happiness, the reduced levels of dopamine lead to various health issues, such as depression, sadness,…

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Scientists want to CLONE Leonardo da Vinci

Scientists want to CLONE Leonardo da Vinci

Scientists want to CLONE Leonardo da Vinci Scientists : A great ethical debate surrounds the possibility of giving life through cloning techniques to historical characters. While some claim that it cannot be ethical in any way to artificially reproduce human life, others believe that the possibility of bringing back great minds from the past could help solve many of the problems that plague humanity today. Leonardo da Vinci was an Italian Renaissance polymath: painter, sculptor, architect, musician, scientist, mathematician, engineer, inventor, anatomist, geologist, cartographer, botanist, and writer. He is considered one…

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X-37B: Unmanned US space plane returns from orbit after nearly two years in space

X-37B: Unmanned US space plane returns from orbit after nearly two years in spaceGround crew rush to a space craft similar to a space shuttle parked on a runway after landing.

X-37B: Unmanned US space plane returns from orbit after nearly two years in space The US military’s experimental X-37B space plane landed on Sunday at NASA’s Kennedy Space Centre in Florida, completing a classified mission that lasted nearly two years, the Air Force says. Resembling a miniature space shuttle, the unmanned X-37B touched down on a runway formerly used for landings of the now-mothballed space shuttles, the Air Force said. The Boeing-built space plane blasted off in May 2015 from nearby Cape Canaveral Air Force Station aboard an Atlas 5…

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Stargazing Live: Manned missions to the Moon — will NASA or others return to the surface?

Stargazing Live: Manned missions to the Moon — will NASA or others return to the surface? Stargazing Stargzing : It is inevitable that mankind will return to the Moon, but the arguments for going there have changed dramatically since the Apollo missions, experts say. Astronaut Gene Cernan left the last bootprint on the lunar surface 44 years and five months ago, and enthusiasm for another manned voyage became tepid in the decades that followed. Now, competing space agencies and companies are looking to the Moon with a fresh zeal, hoping…

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SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket takes off again in first successful launch of recycled orbital-class booster

SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket takes off again in first successful launch of recycled orbital-class booster

SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket takes off again in first successful launch of recycled orbital-class booster SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket takes off again in first successful launch of recycled orbital-class booster A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket recovered at sea from its maiden flight nearly a year ago has blasted off again from Florida in the first successful launch of a recycled orbital-class booster, which also then managed to return to land on a floating platform at sea. The unprecedented twin achievements of launching a reusable rocket and recovering the vehicle for…

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Astronaut Peggy Whitson breaks US space record, gets call from Donald Trump

Astronaut Peggy Whitson breaks US space record, gets call from Donald Trump

Astronaut Peggy Whitson breaks US space record, gets call from Donald Trump Astronaut Peggy Whitson has broken the US record for the most time in space and talked up a mission to Mars during a congratulatory call from President Donald Trump. The International Space Station’s commander surpassed the record of 534 days, two hours and 48 minutes for most accumulated time in space by an American. “This is a very special day in the glorious history of American spaceflight,” Mr Trump said. Dr Whitson said it was “a huge honour”…

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Catastrophic space junk collision ‘inevitable’ without action, scientists warn

Catastrophic

Catastrophic space junk collision ‘inevitable’ without action, scientists warn Satellites like the International Space Station could be at risk unless scientists take urgent action.(Supplied: NASA) A catastrophic space junk collision that would render the upper reaches of the atmosphere unusable is not a matter of if, but when, space environment experts have warned. Space Environment Research Centre CEO Ben Greene said a lack of data on junk in orbit was “endangering access to space”. “There is so much debris that it is colliding with itself, and creating more debris. A…

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Who were the ancient Egyptians? Mummy DNA reveals surprising clues

Who were the ancient Egyptians? Mummy DNA reveals surprising clues

Who were the ancient Egyptians? Mummy DNA reveals surprising clues Mummies from ancient Egypt have revealed another secret — some of them share very little of the sub-Saharan African ancestry that dominates the genetic heritage of modern Egyptians. Key points Genetic analysis done on 93 mummies that lived in an important centre in ancient Egypt Ancient genome from this area contains almost no sub-Saharan DNA that dominates the genetic profile of modern Egyptians It more closely resembles the genetic heritage of people from the Near East and Levant The discovery,…

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Superantibiotic is 25,000 times more potent than its predecessor

Superantibiotic is 25,000 times more potent than its predecessor

Superantibiotic is 25,000 times more potent than its predecessor Superantibiotic : The world’s last line of defense against disease-causing bacteria just got a new warrior: vancomycin 3.0. Its predecessor—vancomycin 1.0—has been used since 1958 to combat dangerous infections like methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. But as the rise of resistant bacteria has blunted its effectiveness, scientists have engineered more potent versions of the drug—vancomycin 2.0. Now, version 3.0 has a unique three-pronged approach to killing bacteria that could give doctors a powerful new weapon against drug-resistant bacteria and help researchers engineer more…

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Cybathlon: Battle of the bionic athletes

Cybathlon Battle of the bionic athletes Kevin Andrew Evison at CybathlonImage copyrightGETTY IMAGES Image captionCompetitors had to cut bread, unwrap a sugar cube and open a a jam jar as part of a breakfast-themed task in the powered arm prosthesis race Bionic arms, robotic legs, powered exoskeletons, brain-controlled computer interfaces and supercharged wheelchairs - all took centre stage to compete at this weekend's Cybathlon. Dubbed as the world's first "bionic Olympics", you might assume this to be a mini-Paralympics with some cutting-edge technology added to the mix. But the focus of the event was less about athletics - and you could argue, less about competition - and more about what the future could hold for those with disabilities. Participants of the brain-computer interface race at the CybathlonImage copyrightREUTERS Image captionThe brain-computer interface race required competitors to control avatars in a specially developed computer game The competition was held near Zurich and saw a 4,600-strong crowd cheer on the innovation and hard work of 66 teams of technologists, developers and "pilots" - as the competitors were called - had put in. It was a truly awe-inspiring display of assistive technologies that aim to overcome day-to-day practical challenges. Billy Costello of Iceland competes during the leg prosthesis race at the CybathlonImage copyrightGETTY IMAGES Image captionThe powered leg prosthesis race was open to competitors who had had above-knee amputations Opening a door towards you while in a wheelchair, for example. is currently tricky to do. Likewise, climbing stairs with prosthetic legs is not easy, and many people find existing arm prostheses are not practical enough to be desirable to wear. The contest featured a mix of devices that were newly designed and others that are already on the market. Pilots with varying spinal cord injuries and bilateral leg amputations took on multi-terrain surfaces and stairs in powered wheelchairs. Sivashankar Sivakanthan and Yuri Larin compete in the powered wheelchair raceImage copyrightREUTERS Image captionContestants had to cope with obstacles in their path in the powered wheelchair race The final descent from the steps was somewhat nerve-wracking to watch. What was probably carefully calculated physics looked like it could easily end in competitors taking nasty tumbles. Some glided smoothly, others with a little more impact than appeared ideal. One even braved the auditorium stairs, which, quite frankly, I'd found challenging in heels. Contestant travels down stairs in Cybathlon Image captionOne of the competitors climbed down the steep steps of the Swiss venue in a powered wheelchair Another race saw functional electrical stimulation (FES) used to activate the leg muscles of paralysed "pilots" to ride bikes. Some attached to the surface of the skin. But one US team achieved this via actual implants. Michael McClellan competes at the functional electrical stimulation bike raceImage copyrightEPA Image captionCompetitors pedalled bicycles by artificially stimulating their nerves to initiate muscle contractions Contestants' facial expressions showed focus, euphoria, occasional frustration and subsequent exhaustion - a mere glimpse at what this could actually mean for real-world use. Cybathlon: The winners Cybathlon medalImage copyrightGETTY IMAGES The UK's highest placed entrant was Johnny Beer Timms, who took silver in the functional electrical stimulation bike race on behalf of Team BerkelBike. But it was Switzerland and Iceland that had greatest success in the inaugural event, with a mix of teams taking back three medals apiece to each of the two countries. The gold medal winners were as follows: Brain-computer interface race: Numa Poujouly - Team Brain Tweakers (Switzerland) Functional electrical stimulation bike race: Mark Muhn - Team Cleveland (US) Powered arm prosthesis race: Robert (Bob) Radocy - Team Dipo Power (Netherlands) Powered exoskeleton raceImage copyrightGETTY IMAGES Powered exoskeleton race: Andre Van Ruschen - Team ReWalk (Germany) Powered leg prosthesis race: Helgi Sveinsson - Team Rheo Knee (Iceland) Powered wheelchair race: Florian Hauser - Team HSR Enhanced (Switzerland) See the full results Arm amputees used robotic prosthetic arms featuring hands in all shapes and sizes. Some formed like a human hand, others were designed for function and easy grasping. They took on tasks including opening cans, changing light bulbs, slicing bread and hanging up clothes. Claudia Breidbach competes at the powered arm prosthesis raceImage copyrightEPA Image captionOne of the powered arm prosthesis race tasks involved removing clothes from a hamper and hanging them on a rail "The next challenge is the touch sensitive nature of the fingers," said Martin Wallace, development manager for Steeper, one of the companies producing robotic hands. "There's no feedback at the moment on the commercial hands getting the signal back to the body - how hard someone is gripping something, or how hot something is, which you could feel with your actual fingers. "So, getting that technology in would be ideal". Cybathlon Image captionThe Cybathlon was held near Zurich at Kloten, Switzerland One event involved pilots with complete paraplegia - loss of motor and sensory function in their lower limbs - donning powered exoskeletons. They had to put their full focus into getting up on their feet to embark on the course. "It's like climbing a mountain or running a marathon", Philipp Wipfli, from Swiss team Varileg, said. Philipp Wipfli competes during the powered exoskeleton raceImage copyrightREUTERS Image captionPhilipp Wipfli ended up in fifth place in the powered exoskeleton race While a small boy in the audience voiced his disappointment that this was not like robots in the movies, to those over six, this was a fantastic feat of mankind. Cybathlon's organisers, ETH Zurich and NCCR Robotics professor Robert Riener, have already achieved one of their goals: to spur on new conversations between technologists and those living with disabilities. Eric Anselmo trains for the brain-computer interface raceImage copyrightEPA Image captionA second Cybathlon is planned for 2020 And after a day full of fighting spirit, optimism, excitement, and of course a few obligatory technical malfunctions, we have a taste of what the future could bring. But making all the innovations reliable and financially viable for real world use may still take a bit of time.

Cybathlon: Battle of the bionic athletes Image copyrightGETTY IMAGESImage captionCompetitors had to cut bread, unwrap a sugar cube and open a a jam jar as part of a breakfast-themed task in the powered arm prosthesis race Bionic arms, robotic legs, powered exoskeletons, brain-controlled computer interfaces and supercharged wheelchairs – all took centre stage to compete at this weekend’s Cybathlon. Dubbed as the world’s first “bionic Olympics”, you might assume this to be a mini-Paralympics with some cutting-edge technology added to the mix. But the focus of the event was less…

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Bipasha Basu-Karan Singh Grover Wedding: Here’s What 1st Wife Shraddha Nigam Has To Say

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College Students Create Drone Packed With ‘Fireball’ That Can Douse Flames & Save Lives In Time

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Terrorists’ moral judgment probed in psychology test

Terrorists' moral judgment probed in psychology testA paper jigsaw of a human head

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Britain’s great explorations now online

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Amazon founder Jeff Bezos: ‘It’s time to go back to the Moon, but this time to STAY’

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China to mine asteroids for platinum worth TRILLIONS and use them for interstellar travel

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Time travel POSSIBLE? Black holes could be key to cheating Einstein’s theory, expert says

POSSIBLE

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